Volume 3, Issue 6, December 2014, Page: 89-93
Orientational Behavior of Liquid-Crystalline Polymers with Amide Groups
Genichiro Shimada, Division of Materials Science and Production Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Oita University, Oita 870-1192, Japan
Masanori Nata, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, Oita 870-1192, Japan
Shiori Tomitaka, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, Oita 870-1192, Japan
Seiji Ujiie, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Oita University, Oita 870-1192, Japan
Received: Dec. 7, 2014;       Accepted: Dec. 25, 2014;       Published: Jan. 6, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.am.20140306.14      View  2809      Downloads  175
Abstract
Liquid-crystalline polyacrylamides with mesogenic side-chains were synthesized by the radical polymerization of a mesogenic acrylamide derivative. Their thermal properties and orientational behavior were examined by polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, temperature-variable IR, and X-ray diffraction measurements. The liquid-crystalline polyacrylamides containing secondary amide groups formed smectic A and smectic B phases during heating and cooling processes. The glass-smectic B, smectic B-A, and smectic A-isotropic phase transition temperatures increased with increasing molecular weight. The liquid-crystalline polyacrylamide showed higher phase transition temperatures than a liquid-crystalline polyacrylate, in which the secondary amide group was replaced with an ester group. The X-ray diffraction pattern of a smectic B-oriented sample of the liquid-crystalline polyacrylamide consisted of sharp inner and very sharp outer reflections. The very sharp reflection in the wide-angle region of the X-ray diffraction pattern indicated the formation of hexatic packing within the layer. The relationship between the layer distance and the extended mesogenic side-chain length suggested that the liquid-crystalline polyacrylamide formed an interdigitated bilayer structure. The IR spectra of the liquid-crystalline polyacrylamide exhibited that the number of hydrogen bonds between the secondary amide groups decreased with increasing temperature. In the liquid-crystalline polyacrylamide, smectic A and smectic B phases, with enhanced thermal stability, were formed through the formation of hydrogen bonds between the secondary amide groups.
Keywords
Liquid Crystal Polymer, Amide, Urethane, IR, Hydrogen Bonding
To cite this article
Genichiro Shimada, Masanori Nata, Shiori Tomitaka, Seiji Ujiie, Orientational Behavior of Liquid-Crystalline Polymers with Amide Groups, Advances in Materials. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2014, pp. 89-93. doi: 10.11648/j.am.20140306.14
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